Horsfordia

A. Gray

Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts 22: 296. 1887.

Etymology: For Frederick Hinsdale Horsford, 1855 – 1923, Vermont farmer and commercial seedsman, and probably also for Eben Norton Horsford, 1818 – 1893, chemist
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 6. Treatment on page 267. Mentioned on page 215, 217.

[Herbs] shrubs, hairy. Stems erect, stellate-tomentose or stellate-scabrous. Leaves petiolate to sessile distally; stipules deciduous, linear to subulate; blade ovate to triangular or lanceolate to included, anthers at apex; ovules 1 per cell, 1–3 per carpel; styles 6–11-branched; stigmas capitate. Fruits schizocarps, sometimes on reflexed, jointed pedicel, spheric to subspheric, indurate; mericarps [6–]9 or 10[or 11], ± 2-celled, winged, flared at papery apex, lower cell rugose, stellate-hairy, sparsely hirsute, indehiscent, endoglossum absent, upper cell smooth, dehiscent apically. Seeds 1 in rugose portion, 1 or 2 apically, sometimes abortive, glabrous or minutely hairy. x = 15.

Distribution

sw United States, nw Mexico.

Discussion

Species 4 (2 in flora).

Selected References

None.

Key

1 Petals rose, pink, or lavender, 12–21 mm; mericarp wings lanceolate; seeds minutely scabridulous. Horsfordia alata
1 Petals yellow or sometimes pale orange, 6–9 mm; mericarp wings ovate; seeds densely short-pubescent. Horsfordia newberryi
... more about "Horsfordia"
John La Duke +
A. Gray +
sw United States +  and nw Mexico. +
For Frederick Hinsdale Horsford, 1855 – 1923, Vermont farmer and commercial seedsman, and probably also for Eben Norton Horsford, 1818 – 1893, chemist +
Proc. Amer. Acad. Arts +
Mallow +
Horsfordia +
Malvaceae subfam. Malvoideae +