Juncus coriaceus

Mackenzie

Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club 56:28. 1929

Treatment appears in FNA Volume 22.

Herbs, perennial, tufted, 3–9 dm. Rhizomes densely branching. Culms few to many. Cataphylls 1–3. Leaves basal, 0–1(–2); auricles 0.2–0.4(–0.6) mm, scarious to leathery; blade nearly terete but slightly channeled adaxially, 10–50 cm × 0.7–1.8 mm, margins entire.. Inflorescences falsely lateral, 5–35-flowered, loose to congested, 1–8 cm; primary bract exceeding inflorescence. Flowers: pedicels 0.5–2.5 mm; bracteoles 2; tepals dark green, lanceolate, 3.5–5 mm; inner series slightly shorter, apex acute; stamens 6, fewer in cleistogamous flowers, filaments 0.8–1.2 mm, anthers 0.5–1.1 mm; style 0.9–1.3 mm. Capsules light to dark brown, 1-locular, widely ovoid to nearly globose, 3.5–5 × 2.6–3.2 mm. Seeds light to dark brown, oblate, 0.55–0.73 mm, not tailed. 2n = 80.


Phenology: Flowering and fruiting spring–early summer.
Habitat: Springy, wet woodlands, stream banks, marshy areas, flatwood depressions, and shaded or exposed disturbed, sites with poor drainage

Distribution

V22 164-distribution-map.jpg

Ala., Ark., Del., Fla., Ga., Ky., La., Md., Miss., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Okla., S.C., Tenn., Tex.as, Va.

Discussion

Selected References

None.

Lower Taxa

None.

... more about "Juncus coriaceus"
Ralph E. Brooks* +  and Steven E. Clemants* +
Mackenzie +
Ala. +, Ark. +, Del. +, Fla. +, Ga. +, Ky. +, La. +, Md. +, Miss. +, N.J. +, N.Y. +, N.C. +, Okla. +, S.C. +, Tenn. +, Tex.as +  and Va. +
Springy, wet woodlands, stream banks, marshy areas, flatwood depressions, and shaded or exposed disturbed, sites with poor drainage +
Flowering and fruiting spring–early summer. +
Bulletin of the Torrey Botanical Club +
Juncus sect. Poiophylli +, Juncus subg. Pseudo-tenageia +, Juncus sect. Tenageia +  and Juncus subg. Tenageia +
Juncus coriaceus +
Juncus subg. Poiophylli +
species +