Ulota obtusiuscula

Müller Hal. & Kindberg in J. Macoun and N. C. Kindberg

in J. Macoun and N. C. Kindberg, Cat. Canad. Pl., Musci, 82. 1892

Endemic
Synonyms: Orthotrichum obtusiusculum (Müller Hal. & Kindberg) Kindberg Ulota alaskana Cardot & Thériot
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 28. Treatment on page 78. Mentioned on page 50, 73, 74, 75.
Plants 1–4 cm. Stems erect. Stem leaves contorted-crisped, some tightly twisted when dry, linear to linear-lanceolate, 1.8–4 mm; base ovate; margins reflexed; apex acute; basal laminal cells elongate, grading to quadrate at margin, pale yellow, walls thick; distal cells 7–13 µm, papillae conic, sometimes large. Specialized asexual reproduction absent. Sexual condition autoicous; perichaetial leaves not differentiated from stem leaves. Seta 2–7(–10) mm. Capsule oblong to oblong-conic, 1.2–2.5 mm, 8-ribbed to 1/2–3/4 length, mouth wide, evenly tapering from mouth to seta; stomata in neck; peristome double; exostome teeth reflexed to recurved, densely and finely papillose; endostome segments 8, finely reticulate. Calyptra conic, very hairy. Spores 24–32 µm.

Habitat: Epiphytic in temperate rainforests
Elevation: low elevations

Distribution

V28 120-distribution-map.gif

B.C., Alaska, Calif., Oreg., Wash.

Discussion

Ulota obtusiuscula has conspicuously twisted and contorted leaves, even when wet. The long capsules, which are not much contracted below the mouth and peristome, remain erect for much of their maturity. The plants are larger than those of U. crispa. Ulota obtusiuscula is distributed from northern California north to southern Alaska, occurring inland in western Washington and disjunct in southeastern British Columbia, whereas U. crispa is confined in North America to the eastern half of the continent, and reports of it from the west are mostly young plants of U. obtusiuscula. On the West Coast, no other species of Ulota has such strongly twisted leaves and forms cushions.

References

None.

Lower Taxa

No lower taxa listed.