Veratrum viride var. viride

Treatment appears in FNA Volume 26. Treatment on page 74. Mentioned on page 70, 75.

Stems glabrous proximally, ± tomentose distally. Leaves 15–25 × 10–18 cm. Inflorescences with branches ascending to spreading, only rarely drooping. Flowers spreading to rarely erect; tepals deep green, 6–10 mm. 2n = 32.


Phenology: Flowering early summer–fall.
Habitat: Moist clearings, shaded woodlands
Elevation: 0–1600 m

Distribution

V26 57-distribution-map.jpg

N.B., Nfld. and Labr., Que., Conn., Del., Ga., Maine, Md., Mass., N.H., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Ohio, Pa., R.I., S.C., Tenn., Vt., Va., W.Va.

Discussion

Eastern Native Americans (Cherokee and Iroquois) used Veratrum viride var. viride as an antirheumatic and analgesic as well as a cold, skin, and orthopedic aid (D. E. Moerman 1986). Colonial settlers soaked corn seeds in an infusion of the plant to kill marauding birds (J. U. Lloyd 1897). This variety is considered a pasture weed in areas around Quebec and in the New England states (C. A. Taylor 1956).

Selected References

None.

Lower Taxa

None.

Dale W. McNeal Jr. +  and Aaron D. Shaw +
N.B. +, Nfld. and Labr. +, Que. +, Conn. +, Del. +, Ga. +, Maine +, Md. +, Mass. +, N.H. +, N.J. +, N.Y. +, N.C. +, Ohio +, Pa. +, R.I. +, S.C. +, Tenn. +, Vt. +, Va. +  and W.Va. +
0–1600 m +
Moist clearings, shaded woodlands +
Flowering early summer–fall. +
W2 +, W1 +, Illustrated +  and Endemic +
Acelidanthus +, Evonyxis +  and Leimanthium +
Veratrum viride var. viride +
Veratrum viride +
variety +