Xylosma

G. Forster

Fl. Ins. Austr., 72. 1786

Etymology: Greek xylon, wood, and osme, odor, alluding to fragrant wood of some Pacific species
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 7. Treatment on page 163. Mentioned on page 5, 8, 164.

Shrubs [trees], often ± heterophyllous, not clonal; branching sympodial. Stems usually spinose, sometimes unarmed, spines simple and/or compound. Leaves usually persistent, sometimes ± deciduous (sometimes congested at apices of relatively short lateral branches); stipules absent; petiole not glandular. Inflorescences axillary, fasciculate [racemose], 1 or 2 per axil. Pedicels articulate. Flowers: sepals 4–6 (± persistent, connate proximally, imbricate); disc lobed (lobes extrastaminal, ± confluent [distinct]); stamens [8–]16–24[–50+] (usually exserted); filaments distinct; ovary 2- or 3-carpellate; style indistinct [relatively short]; stigmas 2 or 3, expanded, obcompressed, ± lobed. Fruits baccate. Seeds: aril absent. x = 10.

Distribution

Tex., Mexico, West Indies, Central America, South America, se Asia, Pacific Islands.

Discussion

Species 80–90 (1 in the flora).

The infrageneric taxonomy of New-World Xylosma is confused and perplexing. Relatively few characters vary significantly and they seem to do so independently, in a complex pattern of intergrading morphologies. Of species that have been recognized, relatively few are unequivocally distinct.

Lower Taxa

... more about "Xylosma"
Robert W. Kiger +
G. Forster +
Tex. +, Mexico +, West Indies +, Central America +, South America +, se Asia +  and Pacific Islands. +
Greek xylon, wood, and osme, odor, alluding to fragrant wood of some Pacific species +
Fl. Ins. Austr., +
kiger2001a +  and sleumer1980a +
Xylosma +
Salicaceae +