Drypetes

Vahl

Eclog. Amer. 3: 49. 1807

Etymology: Probably from Greek drypa, dried olive or drupe, alluding to fruit
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 12. Treatment on page 369. Mentioned on page 328, 368.
Trees [shrubs]; trunks often fluted; indumentum of simple hairs. Leaves often subdistichous; stipules deciduous [persistent]; blade base oblique [rarely symmetrical]. Pedicels present. Staminate flowers: sepals 4–5[–7]; nectary intrastaminal, lobed [annular]; stamens 1–2 times number of sepals [or –50]; pistillode ± rudimentary. Pistillate flowers: sepals 4–5[–7]; nectary annular or lobed [absent]; styles 1 mm or less; stigmas dilated [2-fid, reniform, or subpeltate]. x = 10.

Distribution

Florida, Mexico, West Indies, Central America, South America, Asia, Africa, Indian Ocean Islands, Pacific Islands, Australia, tropical and subtropical regions.

Discussion

Species ca. 200 (2 in the flora).

References

None.

Lower Taxa

Key

1 Ovaries 2-carpellate; stigmas 2; drupes red-orange at maturity, endocarps 0.5 mm thick, brittle; stamens 4(–5); leaves thick-papery, apices usually abruptly acute to acuminate, venation finely reticulate; buds not resinous. Drypetes lateriflora
1 Ovaries 1-carpellate; stigma 1; drupes white at maturity, endocarps 1–2 mm thick, bony; stamens 8(–10); leaves leathery, apices usually rounded to obtuse, if acute, not abruptly so, venation coarsely reticulate; buds resinous. Drypetes diversifolia