Dryopteris celsa

(W. Palmer) Knowlton
W. Palmer, & Pollard, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 13: 202. 1900.
Common names: Log fern
Endemic
Basionym: Dryopteris goldiana subsp. celsa W. Palmer Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. 13: 65. 1899
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 2.

Leaves monomorphic, dying back in winter, 65–120 × 15–30 cm. Petiole 1/3 length of leaf, scaly at least at base; scales scattered, dark brown or tan with dark central stripe. Blade green, ovate-lanceolate, gradually tapering to tip, pinnate-pinnatifid, herbaceous, not glandular. Pinnae ± in plane of blade, lanceolate-ovate; basal pinnae linear-oblong, much reduced, basal pinnules longer than adjacent pinnules, basal basiscopic pinnule and basal acroscopic pinnule equal; pinnule margins crenately toothed. Sori midway between midvein and margin of segments. Indusia lacking glands. 2n = 164.


Habitat: Seepage slopes, hammocks and logs in swamps, mostly on the Piedmont and Coastal Plain
Elevation: 50–800 m

Distribution

V2 221-distribution-map.gif

Ala., Ark., Del., Ga., Ill., Ky., La., Md., Mich., Mo., N.J., N.Y., N.C., Pa., S.C., Tenn., Va., W.Va.

Discussion

Dryopteris celsa is a fertile allotetraploid derived from hybridization between D. goldieana and D. ludoviciana. Dryopteris celsa hybridizes with six species; hybrids can usually be identified by the dark-striped scales.

Selected References

None.

Lower Taxa

None.

... more about "Dryopteris celsa"
James D. Montgomery +  and Warren H. Wagner Jr. +
(W. Palmer) Knowlton +
Dryopteris goldiana subsp. celsa +
Log fern +
Ala. +, Ark. +, Del. +, Ga. +, Ill. +, Ky. +, La. +, Md. +, Mich. +, Mo. +, N.J. +, N.Y. +, N.C. +, Pa. +, S.C. +, Tenn. +, Va. +  and W.Va. +
50–800 m +
Seepage slopes, hammocks and logs in swamps, mostly on the Piedmont and Coastal Plain +
W. Palmer, & Pollard, Proc. Biol. Soc. Wash. +
Dryopteris celsa +
Dryopteris +
species +