Berberis amplectens

(Eastwood) L. C. Wheeler

Rhodora 39: 376. 1937

Conservation concernEndemic
Basionyms: Mahonia amplectens Eastwood Proc. Calif. Acad. Sci., ser. 4, 20: 145. 1931
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 3.
Shrubs, evergreen, 0.2-1.2 m. Stems monomorphic, without short axillary shoots. Bark of 2d-year stems purple, glabrous. Bud scales 3-6 mm, deciduous. Spines absent. Leaves 5-7-foliolate; petioles 1.5-5 cm. Leaflet blades thick and rigid; surfaces abaxially dull, papillose, adaxially dull, ± glaucous; terminal leaflet stalked, blade 4.4-5.5 × 3.1-4.6 cm, 1.1-1.4 times as long as wide; lateral leaflet blades oblong or circular, 1-5-veined from base, base truncate or cordate, margins undulate or crispate, toothed, each with 9-15 teeth 1-3 mm tipped with spines to 1.4-2.4 × 0.2-0.4 mm, apex truncate or broadly rounded. Inflorescences racemose, dense, 25-35-flowered, 3-6 cm; bracteoles membranous, apex obtuse or rounded. Flowers: anther filaments distally with pair of recurved teeth: author had no data available. Berries dark blue, glaucous, ovoid to elliptic, 7-9 mm, juicy, solid. 2n = 28.

Phenology: Flowering spring (Apr–May).
Habitat: Rocky slopes in chaparral and open forest
Elevation: 900-1900 m

Discussion

Of conservation concern.

Berberis amplectens is endemic to the Peninsular Ranges of southern California. It is resistant to infection by Puccinia graminis.

References

None.

Lower Taxa

No lower taxa listed.