Cichorium intybus

Linnaeus

Sp. Pl. 2: 813. 1753

Common names: Chicory chicorée
IntroducedIllustrated
Treatment appears in FNA Volume 19. Treatment on page 222.

Perennials (sometimes flowering first year). Leaves: blades of basal 5–35+ × 1–8(–12+) cm; cauline similar, smaller, narrower, distal mostly linear. Peduncles mostly 0–2 mm, some narrowly clavate, 12–45(–85+) mm. Phyllaries: outer 5–6 lance-ovate to lanceolate, 4–7 mm, basally cartilaginous, distally herbaceous, inner 8+ lance-linear to linear, 6–12 mm, herbaceous, all usually with some gland-tipped hairs 0.5–0.8 mm on margins near bases or on abaxial faces toward tips. Cypselae 2–3 mm; pappi 0.01–0.2 mm. 2n = 18.


Phenology: Flowering Apr–Jul.
Habitat: Disturbed sites
Elevation: 0–1500 m

Distribution

V19-273-distribution-map.gif

Introduced; St. Pierre and Miquelon, Alta., B.C., Man., N.B., Nfld. and Labr., N.S., Ont., P.E.I., Que., Sask., Ark., Calif., Conn., Ill., Ind., Iowa, Kans., Maine, Mass., Mich., Mo., Nev., N.H., N.Y., N.C., Pa., R.I., Tex., Utah, Vt., Europe, Asia, introduced also in Africa, South America.

Discussion

Leaves of Cichorium intybus are sometimes used as salad greens; the roasted roots are sometimes ground and used as an addition to (or adulterant of) coffee.

Selected References

None.

Lower Taxa

None.

... more about "Cichorium intybus"
John L. Strother +
Linnaeus +
Chicory +  and chicorée +
St. Pierre and Miquelon +, Alta. +, B.C. +, Man. +, N.B. +, Nfld. and Labr. +, N.S. +, Ont. +, P.E.I. +, Que. +, Sask. +, Ark. +, Calif. +, Conn. +, Ill. +, Ind. +, Iowa +, Kans. +, Maine +, Mass. +, Mich. +, Mo. +, Nev. +, N.H. +, N.Y. +, N.C. +, Pa. +, R.I. +, Tex. +, Utah +, Vt. +, Europe +, Asia +, introduced also in Africa +  and South America. +
0–1500 m +
Disturbed sites +
Flowering Apr–Jul. +
Introduced +  and Illustrated +
Undefined tribe Lactuceae +
Cichorium intybus +
Cichorium +
species +